C40 Cities launches research on South Africa green jobs - C40 Cities

Wednesday, March 30, 2022
author picture Lucas Simon
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Video/image source : youtube, cdnshortp
Original content created by news.limited staff

New research from C40 Cities reveals the need for more green jobs in South Africa and other African countries. According to Hastings Chikoko‚ Regional Director of C40 Cities for Africa‚ there is no better time to invest in green jobs in South Africa than now. Climate change is a growing global problem‚ and the need for new job creation in this area has never been greater. The research also highlights the importance of cities in addressing this challenge and identifying the skills required to fill these positions. The C40 network is a global network of nearly 100 world-leading cities that are taking action to tackle climate change and create a better future for all. According to the new research‚ directing COVID-19 recovery funds to green jobs in South Africa could create over 1.8 million new jobs for the country. The findings could also help the country meet its ambitious 2030 climate target. In South Africa‚ a recent study showed that more than a quarter of its economy would be invested in sustainable‚ high-quality jobs. The report's findings highlight the importance of green jobs in South Africa. By 2030‚ ambitious urban climate action could generate more than 1.8 million green jobs. These would be part of the green recovery of COVID-19 and would include 1.1 million in the building‚ power and sustainable transport sectors. In addition‚ a further 674‚000 would be created in the energy and water sector. This study shows that investing in adaptation measures could result in 705‚000 new‚ sustainable jobs in South Africa. The research shows that ambitious urban climate action can create up to 1.8 million new green jobs in South Africa by 2030. As part of the green recovery from COVID-19‚ over one million of these jobs would be created in the building‚ power and sustainable transport sectors. A further 58% of jobs would be created in the building‚ power‚ and sustainable transport sectors. With this investment‚ the government could potentially meet its climate target in the next decade. The C40 Cities network is a global network of nearly 100 cities that are taking urgent action to tackle climate change. It is committed to creating a future where everyone can thrive‚ including the planet's population. Its recent research shows that this strategy can create more than 1.8 million green jobs in South Africa by 2030 if ambitious urban climate action is implemented. And this will be a significant boost for the economy of South Africa‚ as the nation meets its target of zero greenhouse gas emissions. The C40 Cities report shows that if South Africa implements aggressive urban climate action‚ it could create 1.8 million green jobs by 2030‚ as part of its green recovery from COVID-19.

c40 cities launches research on south africa green jobs
Image source : cdnshortp

In addition‚ over half of these jobs would be created in the building‚ power‚ and sustainable transport sectors‚ and the country would meet its climate goals in the same time. This means a significant boost for the South African economy. This report suggests that investing in green cities can create 900‚000 jobs. By improving energy efficiency‚ cities could also reach the 2030 climate target‚ thereby making it possible to reach a higher ambition for the Paris Agreement. The study is expected to lead to more investments in cities. But what about the economic impact? This research will also be useful for policymakers and investors in South Africa. The results will be presented at a conference in the US on the future of the country. In South Africa‚ if all cities act urgently‚ they could create 1.8 million green jobs by 2030. A lot of these jobs would be in the building and power sectors. But the research is important for the country's climate goals as it could help make the country a much more attractive place to live and work in. The research will also help local businesses adapt to the deteriorating climate.